NOW OPEN: International Conference on Future Africa | April 14-16, 2020

Conference Program

Get the full details on the 2020 edition of our TAFFD's Conference Series

TAFFD's 2020 Conference Program

Day 1
14 Apr 2020
Day 2
15 Apr 2020
Day 3
16 Apr 2020

REGISTRATION

Arrival / Registration and Accreditation of Participants. All Participants will arrive at University of Rwanda/Kigali Convention Exhibition Village, Kigali Hall.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
REGISTRATION
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

Conference introduction workshop. SUB THEME / FOCUS Global Warming/Climatic Change Technological Singularity Internet of Things (IoT) Transhumanism and Humanity + Futurism Renewable Energies Peace Challenges & Conflict Resolution International Policy Biotechnology Neuroscience & Neuroweapons Digital Leadership Digital Business
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

OPENING LECTURE

A public lecture (also known as an open lecture) is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr. Johann Gaspar Spurzheim, advocate of phrenology, was conducted after his death, and his brain, skull, and heart were removed, preserved in jars of alcohol, and put on display to the public. Public autoposies have sometimes verged on entertainment: American showman P. T. Barnum held a public autopsy of Joice Heth after her death. Heth was a woman whom Barnum had been featuring as being over 160 years old. Barnum charged 50 cents admission. The autopsy demonstrated that she had in fact been between 76 and 80 years old.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
OPENING LECTURE
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

KEYNOTE & BRUNCH

A keynote in public speaking is a talk that establishes a main underlying theme. In corporate or commercial settings, greater importance is attached to the delivery of a keynote speech or keynote address. The keynote establishes the framework for the following programme of events or convention agenda; frequently the role of keynote speaker[1][2] will include that of convention moderator. It will also flag up a larger idea—a literary story, an individual musical piece, or event. At political or industrial conventions and expositions and at academic conferences, the keynote address or keynote speech is delivered to set the underlying tone and summarize the core message or most important revelation of the event. Keynote speeches are also given at the graduation and commencement ceremonies of colleges, universities, and major high schools, usually by accomplished academics or celebrities invited by the student body. These speeches are often called a commencement speech. Keynote speakers are often selected to raise interest in a particular event, such as a conference or large meeting sponsored by a corporation or association, and draw attendees to attend that program. Selecting a keynote speaker who is well known for his or her expertise in a particular field, or who has wide name recognition due to other accomplishments, will probably raise enthusiasm among prospective attendees for a meeting or conference. Increasingly the word keynote is being used as a synonym for plenary session or “invited talk,” with some conferences having an opening keynote, a closing keynote, and many other keynotes. A...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
KEYNOTE & BRUNCH
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

GROUP EXPO VISITS & MEETINGS A

An exhibition, in the most general sense, is an organised presentation and display of a selection of items. In practice, exhibitions usually occur within a cultural or educational setting such as a museum, art gallery, park, library, exhibition hall, or World’s fairs. Exhibitions can include many things such as art in both major museums and smaller galleries, interpretive exhibitions, natural history museums and history museums, and also varieties such as more commercially focused exhibitions and trade fairs. In British English the word “exhibition” is used for a collection of items placed on display, and the event as a whole, which in American English is usually an “exhibit”. In both varieties of English each object being shown within an exhibition is an “exhibit”. In common usage, “exhibitions” are considered temporary and usually scheduled to open and close on specific dates. While many exhibitions are shown in just one venue, some exhibitions are shown in multiple locations and are called travelling exhibitions, and some are online exhibitions. Exhibitions featuring especially fragile or valuable objects, or live animals—may be shown only during a formal presentation, under the close supervision of attendant or educator. Temporary exhibits that are transported from institution to institution are traveling exhibits. Though exhibitions are common events, the concept of an exhibition is quite wide and encompasses many variables. Exhibitions range from an extraordinarily large event such as a World’s fair exposition to small one-artist solo shows or a display of just one item. Curators are sometimes involved as the...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
GROUP EXPO VISITS & MEETINGS A
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah

GROUP EXPO VISITS & MEETINGS B

An exhibition, in the most general sense, is an organised presentation and display of a selection of items. In practice, exhibitions usually occur within a cultural or educational setting such as a museum, art gallery, park, library, exhibition hall, or World’s fairs. Exhibitions can include many things such as art in both major museums and smaller galleries, interpretive exhibitions, natural history museums and history museums, and also varieties such as more commercially focused exhibitions and trade fairs. In British English the word “exhibition” is used for a collection of items placed on display, and the event as a whole, which in American English is usually an “exhibit”. In both varieties of English each object being shown within an exhibition is an “exhibit”. In common usage, “exhibitions” are considered temporary and usually scheduled to open and close on specific dates. While many exhibitions are shown in just one venue, some exhibitions are shown in multiple locations and are called travelling exhibitions, and some are online exhibitions. Exhibitions featuring especially fragile or valuable objects, or live animals—may be shown only during a formal presentation, under the close supervision of attendant or educator. Temporary exhibits that are transported from institution to institution are traveling exhibits. Though exhibitions are common events, the concept of an exhibition is quite wide and encompasses many variables. Exhibitions range from an extraordinarily large event such as a World’s fair exposition to small one-artist solo shows or a display of just one item. Curators are sometimes involved as the...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
GROUP EXPO VISITS & MEETINGS B
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah

REFRESHMENTS AT EXPO

Enjoy the joys of delicious refreshments after an amazing set of futuristic & educational sessions.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
REFRESHMENTS AT EXPO
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS A

A public lecture (also known as an open lecture) is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr. Johann Gaspar Spurzheim, advocate of phrenology, was conducted after his death, and his brain, skull, and heart were removed, preserved in jars of alcohol, and put on display to the public. Public autoposies have sometimes verged on entertainment: American showman P. T. Barnum held a public autopsy of Joice Heth after her death. Heth was a woman whom Barnum had been featuring as being over 160 years old. Barnum charged 50 cents admission. The autopsy demonstrated that she had in fact been between 76 and 80 years old.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS A
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

SHOWCASE SESSIONS OPENING

An exhibition, in the most general sense, is an organised presentation and display of a selection of items. In practice, exhibitions usually occur within a cultural or educational setting such as a museum, art gallery, park, library, exhibition hall, or World’s fairs. Exhibitions can include many things such as art in both major museums and smaller galleries, interpretive exhibitions, natural history museums and history museums, and also varieties such as more commercially focused exhibitions and trade fairs. In British English the word “exhibition” is used for a collection of items placed on display, and the event as a whole, which in American English is usually an “exhibit”. In both varieties of English each object being shown within an exhibition is an “exhibit”. In common usage, “exhibitions” are considered temporary and usually scheduled to open and close on specific dates. While many exhibitions are shown in just one venue, some exhibitions are shown in multiple locations and are called travelling exhibitions, and some are online exhibitions. Exhibitions featuring especially fragile or valuable objects, or live animals—may be shown only during a formal presentation, under the close supervision of attendant or educator. Temporary exhibits that are transported from institution to institution are traveling exhibits. Though exhibitions are common events, the concept of an exhibition is quite wide and encompasses many variables. Exhibitions range from an extraordinarily large event such as a World’s fair exposition to small one-artist solo shows or a display of just one item. Curators are sometimes involved as the...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
SHOWCASE SESSIONS OPENING
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah

SHOWCASE – TRANSHUMANISM

Transhumanism (abbreviated as H+ or h+) is an international philosophical movement that advocates for the transformation of the human condition by developing and making widely available sophisticated technologies to greatly enhance human intellect and physiology.[1][2] Transhumanist thinkers study the potential benefits and dangers of emerging technologies that could overcome fundamental human limitations as well as the ethical[3] limitations of using such technologies.[4] The most common transhumanist thesis is that human beings may eventually be able to transform themselves into different beings with abilities so greatly expanded from the current condition as to merit the label of posthuman beings.[2] The contemporary meaning of the term “transhumanism” was foreshadowed by one of the first professors of futurology, FM-2030, who taught “new concepts of the human” at The New School in the 1960s, when he began to identify people who adopt technologies, lifestyles and worldviews “transitional” to posthumanity as “transhuman“.[5] The assertion would lay the intellectual groundwork for the British philosopher Max More to begin articulating the principles of transhumanism as a futurist philosophy in 1990, and organizing in California an intelligentsia that has since grown into the worldwide transhumanist movement.[5][6][7] Influenced by seminal works of science fiction, the transhumanist vision of a transformed future humanity has attracted many supporters and detractors from a wide range of perspectives, including philosophy and religion.[5] In 2017, Penn State University Press in cooperation with Stefan Lorenz Sorgner and James Hughes (sociologist) established the “Journal of Posthuman Studies”[8] which is the first Academic journal explicitly dedicated to...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
SHOWCASE – TRANSHUMANISM
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

SHOWCASE – INFO TECH

Information technology (IT) is the use of computers to store, retrieve, transmit, and manipulate data,[1] or information, often in the context of a business or other enterprise.[2] IT is considered to be a subset of information and communications technology (ICT). An information technology system (IT system) is generally an information system, a communications system or, more specifically speaking, a computer system – including all hardware, software and peripheral equipment – operated by a limited group of users. Humans have been storing, retrieving, manipulating, and communicating information since the Sumerians in Mesopotamia developed writing in about 3000 BC,[3] but the term information technology in its modern sense first appeared in a 1958 article published in the Harvard Business Review; authors Harold J. Leavitt and Thomas L. Whisler commented that “the new technology does not yet have a single established name. We shall call it information technology (IT).” Their definition consists of three categories: techniques for processing, the application of statistical and mathematical methods to decision-making, and the simulation of higher-order thinking through computer programs.[4] The term is commonly used as a synonym for computers and computer networks, but it also encompasses other information distribution technologies such as television and telephones. Several products or services within an economy are associated with information technology, including computer hardware, software, electronics, semiconductors, internet, telecom equipment, and e-commerce.[5][a] Based on the storage and processing technologies employed, it is possible to distinguish four distinct phases of IT development: pre-mechanical (3000 BC – 1450 AD), mechanical (1450–1840), electromechanical (1840–1940), and electronic (1940–present).[3]...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
SHOWCASE – INFO TECH
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

SHOWCASE – ROBOTICS

Robotics is a scientific and engineering discipline that is focused on the understanding and use of artificial, embodied capabilities.[1] The people who work in this field (roboticists) come from mechanical engineering, electronic engineering, information engineering, computer science, and other fields. On the engineering side, roboticists deal with the design, construction, operation, and use of robots, especially through computer systems for their control, sensory feedback, and information processing. On the scientific side, roboticists study how a robot’s environment and design affect how well it does its job. Robots are machines that can substitute for humans and replicate human actions and are used to do jobs that are difficult, impossible, or just tedious for humans to do. Robots can be used in many situations and for lots of purposes, but today many are used in dangerous environments (including bomb detection and deactivation), manufacturing processes, or where humans cannot survive (e.g. in space, under water, in high heat, and for clean up and containment of hazardous materials and radiation). Robots can take on any form but some are made to resemble humans in appearance. This is said to help in the acceptance of a robot in certain replicative behaviors usually performed by people. Such robots attempt to replicate walking, lifting, speech, cognition, or any other human activity. Many of today’s robots are inspired by nature, contributing to the field of bio-inspired robotics. The concept of creating machines that can operate autonomously dates back to classical times, but research into the functionality and potential...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
SHOWCASE – ROBOTICS
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Corporate governance is the collection of mechanisms, processes and relations by which corporations are controlled and operated.[1] Governance structures and principles identify the distribution of rights and responsibilities among different participants in the corporation (such as the board of directors, managers, shareholders, creditors, auditors, regulators, and other stakeholders) and include the rules and procedures for making decisions in corporate affairs.[2] Corporate governance is necessary because of the possibility of conflicts of interests between stakeholders,[3] primarily between shareholders and upper management or among shareholders. Corporate governance includes the processes through which corporations’ objectives are set and pursued in the context of the social, regulatory and market environment. These include monitoring the actions, policies, practices, and decisions of corporations, their agents, and affected stakeholders. Corporate governance practices can be seen as attempts to align the interests of stakeholders.[4][5] Interest in the corporate governance practices of modern corporations, particularly in relation to accountability, increased following the high-profile collapses of a number of large corporations in 2001–2002, many of which involved accounting fraud; and then again after the recent financial crisis in 2008. Corporate scandals of various forms have maintained public and political interest in the regulation of corporate governance. In the U.S., these include scandals surrounding Enron and MCI Inc. (formerly WorldCom). Their demise led to the enactment of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act in 2002, a U.S. federal law intended to improve corporate governance in the United States. Comparable failures in Australia (HIH, One.Tel) are associated with the eventual passage of the CLERP 9...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

AWARDS / ROUND TABLE / TOWN HALL EXPO

Conference exhibitors, distinguished participants and TAFFD’s Honorary Members receive acknowledgements & awards for their contributions to the event, to our organization and to humanity through their work.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
AWARDS / ROUND TABLE / TOWN HALL EXPO
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS B

A public lecture (also known as an open lecture) is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr. Johann Gaspar Spurzheim, advocate of phrenology, was conducted after his death, and his brain, skull, and heart were removed, preserved in jars of alcohol, and put on display to the public. Public autoposies have sometimes verged on entertainment: American showman P. T. Barnum held a public autopsy of Joice Heth after her death. Heth was a woman whom Barnum had been featuring as being over 160 years old. Barnum charged 50 cents admission. The autopsy demonstrated that she had in fact been between 76 and 80 years old.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS B
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS C

Sessions on: Politics, Science, Economics, & Technology A public lecture (also known as an open lecture) is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr. Johann Gaspar Spurzheim, advocate of phrenology, was conducted after his death, and his brain, skull, and heart were removed, preserved in jars of alcohol, and put on display to the public. Public autoposies have sometimes verged on entertainment: American showman P. T. Barnum held a public autopsy of Joice Heth after her death. Heth was a woman whom Barnum had been featuring as being over 160 years old. Barnum charged 50 cents admission. The autopsy demonstrated that she had in fact been between 76 and 80 years old.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
SPECIAL INTEREST SESSIONS C
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

TOPIC EXPERT SESSIONS

A collection of reflections from industry experts & leaders. A public lecture (also known as an open lecture) is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr. Johann Gaspar Spurzheim, advocate of phrenology, was conducted after his death, and his brain, skull, and heart were removed, preserved in jars of alcohol, and put on display to the public. Public autoposies have sometimes verged on entertainment: American showman P. T. Barnum held a public autopsy of Joice Heth after her death. Heth was a woman whom Barnum had been featuring as being over 160 years old. Barnum charged 50 cents admission. The autopsy demonstrated that she had in fact been between 76 and 80 years old.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
TOPIC EXPERT SESSIONS
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

CLOSING KEYNOTE

A public lecture (also known as an open lecture) is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr. Johann Gaspar Spurzheim, advocate of phrenology, was conducted after his death, and his brain, skull, and heart were removed, preserved in jars of alcohol, and put on display to the public. Public autoposies have sometimes verged on entertainment: American showman P. T. Barnum held a public autopsy of Joice Heth after her death. Heth was a woman whom Barnum had been featuring as being over 160 years old. Barnum charged 50 cents admission. The autopsy demonstrated that she had in fact been between 76 and 80 years old.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
CLOSING KEYNOTE
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

NETWORKING – MEET & GREET

A social network is a social structure made up of a set of social actors (such as individuals or organizations), sets of dyadic ties, and other social interactions between actors. The social network perspective provides a set of methods for analyzing the structure of whole social entities as well as a variety of theories explaining the patterns observed in these structures.[1] The study of these structures uses social network analysis to identify local and global patterns, locate influential entities, and examine network dynamics. Social networks and the analysis of them is an inherently interdisciplinary academic field which emerged from social psychology, sociology, statistics, and graph theory. Georg Simmel authored early structural theories in sociology emphasizing the dynamics of triads and “web of group affiliations”.[2] Jacob Moreno is credited with developing the first sociograms in the 1930s to study interpersonal relationships. These approaches were mathematically formalized in the 1950s and theories and methods of social networks became pervasive in the social and behavioral sciences by the 1980s.[1][3] Social network analysis is now one of the major paradigms in contemporary sociology, and is also employed in a number of other social and formal sciences. Together with other complex networks, it forms part of the nascent field of network science.[4][5] The social network is a theoretical construct useful in the social sciences to study relationships between individuals, groups, organizations, or even entire societies (social units, see differentiation). The term is used to describe a social structure determined by such interactions. The ties through...
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Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
NETWORKING – MEET & GREET
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea

CLOSING EVENT

Social gathering hosted at the hotel. A public lecture (also known as an open lecture) is one means employed for educating the public in the arts and sciences. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one-way street in London. The Royal Institution’s Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos.
Osinakachi Akuma Kalu
Alexander Chiaha
CLOSING EVENT
Tom Ross
William Coburn
Alejandro De la Parra Solomon
Victoria Ustimenko
Sarita Sharma
Doris Ngozi Morah
Anthony Kimery
Edward Fitzgerald
Miguel Rafael Genovea